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Modern Facebook Marketing – The 8 Best Promotion Methods

Facebook is a massive traffic monster. As of this writing, it has over 2 billion, and that’s with a capital B, daily active users.

Think about that, over 2 billion people using the same website day after day. On top of this, it continues to grow.

Also, when people are on Facebook, they pretty much stay there, and they view page after page of content. In fact, on a month to month basis, as of 2018, Facebook has slightly over 2.3 billion monthly active users.

Of all Americans, 82% use Facebook at some level or another.

If this wasn’t impressive enough, the next platform that gets the highest percentage of American users is Instagram, which is owned by Facebook. Instagram clocks in at 35% of American usage.

Among US residents, 53% reportedly use Facebook several times a day.

 

In terms of the world’s total population, more than 25% of people on the planet use Facebook with some level of frequency.

The point is, Facebook is a massive traffic monster. You really cannot afford to miss out on Facebook and its marketing potential.

If this wasn’t impressive enough, wait, it gets even more mind-blowing. Once people log into Facebook, the system basically keeps tight surveillance on them. And the crazy thing is that this is all done with their permission.

 

When you sign up for Facebook, there is a user license agreement that you must consent to. Unless you read the fine print, you wouldn’t become fully aware that once you sign in, every like, comment, share, as well as pages that you liked and even ads that you clicked, will be monitored by Facebook.

It’s as if by watching your behavior, Facebook can make educated guesses as to what your interests are and can then show you advertising that fits those interests. Sounds pretty fair, right?

Well, this extends across the board. That’s right, every group you join as well as interactions on Messenger are monitored, tracked and targeted by Facebook.

This is not lightweight targeting, mind you. When it comes to fine laser targeting of demographic groups based on individual user behavior, nothing even comes close to Facebook.

As awesome as these traffic statistics, advertising technologies, and promotion potential maybe, I’ve got some bad news to report. Too many businesses still fail to fully leverage Facebook.

This article teaches you the best ways to promote on Facebook. It also gives you step by step instructions, so you can engage in Facebook marketing with a higher than average chance of success.

 

10 Common Facebook Marketing Mistakes

There are very common marketing mistakes that even promotion veterans commit on Facebook. It seems like even the very best of us are not immune to these common mistakes.

It’s a good idea if you want to save a lot of time, effort and money at this point, to become aware of these mistakes. This will decrease the likelihood that you will probably commit these same errors.

 

Starting Off Paid Campaigns with a Bang

Do not start off your paid campaigns with a bang. Start with a free campaign first, build your audience organically, get some consumer intelligence, then you should have the information you need to put together an experimental paid marketing campaign.

Start low and slow. The worst thing you can do is to jump in with a massive budget, and absolutely no clue.

 

Starting a Paid Campaign with an Immature Page

If your page is very new or there’s really not that much engagement yet, you might want to hold off on a paid campaign. You simply don’t have enough target audience profiling information to base a successful paid campaign on.

 

Using Mass Content Posters with Discovery Tools

Many marketers use some sort of one-size-fits-all mass promotions tool for Facebook. They would discover all sorts of Facebook groups and pages, and then they would use this tool to spam those areas.

Don’t do that. You’re not doing your brand any favors when you do that. All you’re really doing is you’re spamming. It’s only a matter of time until you get banned!

 

Promoting Direct Affiliate Links or Direct Sales Page Links

There’s an old saying, “You can lead a horse to water, but you can’t make it drink.” By the same token, you can get a lot of people on Facebook to click on your links, but don’t expect them to convert once they go to that affiliate sales page or your own direct sales page.

Why won’t people buy? After all, they did click on your ad, right? Answer: they haven’t been properly qualified. In many cases, they clicked out of curiosity. Maybe they clicked by mistake.

 

Whatever the case, you still did not get a sale!

Posting direct links is not the way to go. You have to build confidence. You have to build trust first.

 

Pulling Random Content and Curating Them Based Solely on Keywords

You can’t be lazy and just set Facebook publication tools up to just pull any and all content from Facebook that has something to do with your keywords and then just blast them out. You’re just spamming when you do that.

You have to be very deliberate and careful regarding the kind of content, whether curated or not, that you will associate with your brand.

 

Rotating and Republishing the Same Content Over and Over Again

Have you ever gone to a Facebook page and it seems like all the content got reposted over and over again within the same day?

The idea behind this practice is that the more the Facebook audience members see the content, the more likely they will click through.

It looks like you’re just spamming your page fans over and over again. Don’t be surprised if they unlike your page.

 

Wholesale “Optimization” of Ads

Another common rookie mistake on Facebook involves paid ads. If you notice that one of your ads is simply not performing, it’s very tempting to just come up with a brand new ad by completely replacing the ad with something that looks totally different.

When you do this, you really don’t know which part of the new ad is succeeding or failing. You’re basically taking shots in the dark. If your ad’s performance improves, you don’t know what caused the improvement.

Facebook Ads Optimization

You have to have some sort of strategy or method that will enable you to track where the improvement in your click-through and, ultimately, your conversion rates are coming from.

Simply swapping out ads in total or in whole doesn’t really give you the data that you need to make effective decisions.

 

Copy and Paste Competitor Ad Strategy

Some marketers are so lazy that they would just look at their competitors and essentially just copy their ads. Of course, they’re not going to copy word for word, but they still end up failing.

How come? Well, your competitors spent a tremendous amount of money optimizing the ads that they’re showing. Their ads work. However, you won’t get a competitive advantage if you copy them wholesale.

You can’t just copy somebody’s ad without knowing what you’re doing. Indeed, only a certain portion of your competitor’s ads truly deliver results.

If you don’t know what you’re doing, you don’t know what portion that is, so you’re basically taking a wild stab at your ad’s design. You may be saying the wrong things at the right time, or you’re saying the right things to the wrong people. You end up failing.

 

Quitting Paid Marketing Too Early

Many rookie Facebook marketers have a one-time, big-time mindset. They’ve heard of how awesome Facebook traffic is so they put together some hard-earned, precious capital to run an ad campaign. If the campaign doesn’t work out according to their expectations, they’re too quick to pull the plug and quit FB ads altogether.

Just because things aren’t working out, it doesn’t mean that you have to pull the plug on the whole thing. You can stop certain campaigns and start new ones and operate with the same budget. You can make modifications of your existing campaigns.

 

Failing Like a Huge Train Wreck

Have you ever seen a slow-motion train wreck? It’s quite sad because it’s all too predictable, but you can’t turn your head and look the other way.

You want to know what’s coming next. You know, at the back of your head, what exactly is going to happen, but it’s so slow, so massive, that you just can’t help but look.

Your Facebook marketing campaign can proceed in the same way. You know that the campaign is failing, but you can’t quite put your finger on the cause, so you just go through the motions like a deer with its eyes caught in headlights.

Why not choose to learn how to fail quickly?

Since you’re not going to make 100% of your shots, learn to live with this fact and move on.

 

Learn to fail quickly using a tiny budget. This way, you can run many different experiments. Even though the vast majority of them are failures, that’s okay. You only spent a fairly small amount of money figuring out winning ads.

Please understand the nature of the 10 mistakes above. Imagine yourself being in situations where these mistakes are likely to take place.

Learn how to spot them well in advance. Prepare for your Plan B, should you find yourself committing these mistakes.

 

The 8 Most Effective Ways To Marketing on Facebook

There are very common marketing mistakes that even promotion veterans commit on Facebook. It seems like even the very best of us are not immune to these common mistakes.

It’s a good idea if you want to save a lot of time, effort and money at this point, to become aware of these mistakes. This will decrease the likelihood that you will probably commit these same errors.

 

Starting Off Paid Campaigns with a Bang

Do not start off your paid campaigns with a bang. Start with a free campaign first, build your audience organically, get some consumer intelligence, then you should have the information you need to put together an experimental paid marketing campaign.

Start low and slow. The worst thing you can do is to jump in with a massive budget, and absolutely no clue.

 

Starting a Paid Campaign with an Immature Page

If your page is very new or there’s really not that much engagement yet, you might want to hold off on a paid campaign. You simply don’t have enough target audience profiling information to base a successful paid campaign on.

 

Using Mass Content Posters with Discovery Tools

Many marketers use some sort of one-size-fits-all mass promotions tool for Facebook. They would discover all sorts of Facebook groups and pages, and then they would use this tool to spam those areas.

Don’t do that. You’re not doing your brand any favors when you do that. All you’re really doing is you’re spamming. It’s only a matter of time until you get banned!

 

Promoting Direct Affiliate Links or Direct Sales Page Links

There’s an old saying, “You can lead a horse to water, but you can’t make it drink.” By the same token, you can get a lot of people on Facebook to click on your links, but don’t expect them to convert once they go to that affiliate sales page or your own direct sales page.

Why won’t people buy? After all, they did click on your ad, right? Answer: they haven’t been properly qualified. In many cases, they clicked out of curiosity. Maybe they clicked by mistake.

Promoting Affiliate Links on Facebook

Facebook Profile

 

Whatever the case, you still did not get a sale!

Posting direct links is not the way to go. You have to build confidence. You have to build trust first.

 

Pulling Random Content and Curating Them Based Solely on Keywords

You can’t be lazy and just set Facebook publication tools up to just pull any and all content from Facebook that has something to do with your keywords and then just blast them out. You’re just spamming when you do that.

You have to be very deliberate and careful regarding the kind of content, whether curated or not, that you will associate with your brand.

 

Rotating and Republishing the Same Content Over and Over Again

Have you ever gone to a Facebook page and it seems like all the content got reposted over and over again within the same day?

The idea behind this practice is that the more the Facebook audience members see the content, the more likely they will click through.

It looks like you’re just spamming your page fans over and over again. Don’t be surprised if they unlike your page.

 

Wholesale “Optimization” of Ads

Another common rookie mistake on Facebook involves paid ads. If you notice that one of your ads is simply not performing, it’s very tempting to just come up with a brand new ad by completely replacing the ad with something that looks totally different.

When you do this, you really don’t know which part of the new ad is succeeding or failing. You’re basically taking shots in the dark. If your ad’s performance improves, you don’t know what caused the improvement.

You have to have some sort of strategy or method that will enable you to track where the improvement in your click-through and, ultimately, your conversion rates are coming from.

Simply swapping out ads in total or in whole doesn’t really give you the data that you need to make effective decisions.

 

Copy and Paste Competitor Ad Strategy

Some marketers are so lazy that they would just look at their competitors and essentially just copy their ads. Of course, they’re not going to copy word for word, but they still end up failing.

How come? Well, your competitors spent a tremendous amount of money optimizing the ads that they’re showing. Their ads work. However, you won’t get a competitive advantage if you copy them wholesale.

You can’t just copy somebody’s ad without knowing what you’re doing. Indeed, only a certain portion of your competitor’s ads truly deliver results.

If you don’t know what you’re doing, you don’t know what portion that is, so you’re basically taking a wild stab at your ad’s design. You may be saying the wrong things at the right time, or you’re saying the right things to the wrong people. You end up failing.

 

Quitting Paid Marketing Too Early

Many rookie Facebook marketers have a one-time, big-time mindset. They’ve heard of how awesome Facebook traffic is so they put together some hard-earned, precious capital to run an ad campaign. If the campaign doesn’t work out according to their expectations, they’re too quick to pull the plug and quit FB ads altogether.

Just because things aren’t working out, it doesn’t mean that you have to pull the plug on the whole thing. You can stop certain campaigns and start new ones and operate with the same budget. You can make modifications to your existing campaigns.

 

Failing Like a Huge Train Wreck

Have you ever seen a slow-motion train wreck? It’s quite sad because it’s all too predictable, but you can’t turn your head and look the other way.

You want to know what’s coming next. You know, at the back of your head, what exactly is going to happen, but it’s so slow, so massive, that you just can’t help but look.

Your Facebook marketing campaign can proceed in the same way. You know that the campaign is failing, but you can’t quite put your finger on the cause, so you just go through the motions like a deer with its eyes caught in headlights.

 

Why not choose to learn how to fail quickly?

Since you’re not going to make 100% of your shots, learn to live with this fact and move on.

Learn to fail quickly using a tiny budget. This way, you can run many different experiments. Even though the vast majority of them are failures, that’s okay. You only spent a fairly small amount of money figuring out winning ads.

 

Please understand the nature of the 10 mistakes above. Imagine yourself being in situations where these mistakes are likely to take place.

Learn how to spot them well in advance. Prepare for your Plan B, should you find yourself committing these mistakes.

 

Facebook Page Marketing

One of the most obvious ways to market on Facebook is to set up a fan page for your business, your brand, or your cause. Facebook actively promotes this feature of its website.

What it doesn’t tell you is the fact that Facebook has been actively modifying its algorithm to the point that you’re going to have to have very popular content for you to reach most of the people who have expressed interest in whatever it is you’re promoting.

Put simply, not all the people who liked your page will get to see your updates. In fact, in most cases, only a small fraction of those people will get to see your updates.

Sadly, Facebook is actively working to limit the free traffic exposure you would get until you can prove to it that your content is really popular with your page’s fans.

 

Here are the steps you should follow to market on Facebook:

Step #1: Find your competitors on Facebook

The first thing that you need to do is to avoid reinventing the wheel. You need to avoid trying to figure things out on a completely hit or miss basis.

Instead, reverse engineer your competitors. Let them do your homework for you. How? Well, find them on Facebook and learn from what they are doing.

 

Step #2: Get the “industry standard” look and come up with your own take

Every niche has an industry-standard in terms of social media profile, brand appearance, and content strategy. The sooner you understand this, the sooner you will be poised to achieve social media marketing success on Facebook. The longer it takes you to learn this, the longer you will struggle.

Understand that your niche audience has become familiar with how certain brands or websites are positioned on social media. If they can’t make heads or tails of your social media brand, they probably would not like your page. It may seem weird to them because it seems so far off from the “industry standard.”

Your job at this step is to figure out the industry-standard look, content strategy and other elements and come up with your own take.

 

Step #3: Reverse engineer your competitors’ content strategy and curate

Lots of business owners would post “hot content” on their social media accounts as well as their blogs.

Sadly, nine times out of ten, that content goes nowhere. People don’t click on it, share it, comment, or otherwise engage.

What these publishers are doing is basically gambling their content would resonate with their audience.

Don’t do that. Instead, pay attention to what your competitors are doing and look for patterns.

 

If you notice that your competitors keep sharing content regarding the same type of theme or topic, they may be on to something. They wouldn’t waste all this time, effort and energy talking about the same stuff over and over unless, of course, it connects to their audience at some level or another and produced results.

Now, to verify this, look at how many times that piece of content got shared or liked. That should give you some sort of objective proof that this content actually resonates with your target audience members.

When you reverse engineer your competitors, you are essentially copying their strategy to reach the same eyeballs that you’re trying to reach. This also applies to content curation where you take content that is published by other people, and you promote it on your social media platform.

This creates a win-win situation because you’re not ripping off this content. You are copying the content’s link, including a short commentary, and allowing people to click on the link.

 

This creates a win-win situation. The publishers of this content get traffic, you get to build credibility because you’re sharing information that your target audience members would actually be interested in, and this leads to the possibility that they would like your page.

Once you have built up enough page likes, you can then start sharing your own content, which leads to direct traffic to your website.

 

Step #4: Pick the best performing or most popular type of content, and scale up

Post content for a few weeks. Keep publishing, and then look at the content that gets the most engagement. Which shared materials get the most likes? The most shares? The most comments?

At some point, you’re going to ignore other types of content and focus on the ones that perform the best.

For example, if you have a Facebook page on Chihuahuas and you notice that third party articles on Chihuahua houses get a lot of shares, likes, and comments, you might want to eliminate most other types of content and focus on Chihuahua houses because those get the most love from your audience.

 

Step #5: Come up with your own version

Come up with your own version of winning content. For example, you know that Chihuahua houses get a lot of love and are very popular on your page. Come up with your own articles about that topic.

These articles, of course, drive traffic directly to your blog or your online store. These have to be at the same level of quality as your third-party content or better.

Pay attention to how your curated popular content talks about the topic and adopt the same style but deliver something better.

Maybe you should offer longer information, more up to date information, or blog posts that have multimedia elements like videos and graphics. Whatever you need to do, come up with content that basically blows away all the other content that you feature on your page.

 

Step #6: Promotions: photo tagging by your users

This is a free promotion technique. Tell your page fans that you’re going to give them some sort of digital freebie.

Maybe it’s a graphic badge, maybe you’re going to mention their name on a post, maybe you’re going to give them a free eBook or some sort of free software. Whatever the case may be, tell the people who like your page to tag their friends on photos that you are going to post.

Now, these photos, of course, must draw attention to your brand, your website, or your Facebook page. You’re not just having them tag a photo. This photo has to say something. It should be promotional in nature.

The more photo tags you get, the higher the chance that you will get a lot more page likes and also clicks to your website from Facebook.

The best news? You don’t have to offer money. In fact, studies indicate that money offers aren’t all that effective. It’s much better to offer some sort of specialty graphic or digital goodie like a free book or booklet, or maybe a discount code.

 

Step #7: Promotions: comments by your users

Use the same rules as in Step 6, but instead of photo tagging, get your page fans to post comments. It would also help tremendously if the comment includes the name of people on the commenter’s friends list.
I leave it up to you how to craft this. But obviously, the more tags there are in the comments, and the more engaging the comments, the more popular your posts become.

 

Step #8: Call your users to action

If you have people who have already liked your page, post occasional reminders to them that they should invite their friends.
This works because birds of a feather flock together. Seriously. The main reason why you are friends with people in the first place is that they share roughly the same set of interests as you.

People who share basically the same pool of interests tend to attract each other. Take advantage of this fact by calling your page fans to action so they can invite their friends.

 

Step #9: Use Insights to promote your page

As much as possible, I would go through Step 1 to Step 8 and master all steps before I go ahead with Step 9. With Step 9, you’re going to be shelling out money to promote your page.

After a couple of months, you can use Facebook’s very robust audience profiling system called “Insights” to promote your page. You will know the right demographic, and you will also know the right posts and content to promote.

 

Step #10: Boost your most popular content

Use Facebook’s lookalike audience system to find people who are not currently fans of your page. This feature in Facebook’s ad system enables you to reach new audiences who share roughly the same interests as the people who have already demonstrated an interest in your page.

You’re basically using Facebook’s very powerful interest targeting system in terms of demographics and interests to get new eyeballs to your page. This can lead to more likes, which can lead to more readers of your content.

 

From that point, you can then run targeted ads.

 

Facebook Group Marketing

One of the most powerful ways to market on Facebook is through its group feature. Considering what’s been going on with Facebook’s algorithm for its Facebook pages, it’s a good idea to have your own Facebook group as a backup.

Although Facebook has been cutting back on the organic traffic it sends Facebook pages, it’s still worth it to have a page because you get audience insights from it. Another great benefit of having a page is the fact that you can copy and paste content from that page to Facebook groups.

When people see your content in a group, they not only see the content, but they can also see a “like” button. When they click that “like” button, you get a new Facebook page fan.

Facebook Group Marketing

 

The key benefit of having a Facebook group lies invisibility. Facebook has made it clear that they are tweaking their Facebook page to reward actual engagement.

Apparently, Facebook groups are not as suppressed as Facebook pages. In terms of visibility, you stand to reach more of your group members than with the page.

 

The Problem with Facebook Groups

While the visibility for a lot of people is quite good for Facebook groups, it depends on the activity.

If the individual group member is not all that active in your group, maybe the person isn’t liking or commenting, they’re not going to get as many notifications on their Facebook updates section than somebody who is active. This is a big drawback.

The vast majority of people who would join your own Facebook group are not going to be active. They’re just there to read information. They’re just there to sit back and check out what you have to offer.

 

Here’s how you promote using your own FB group

 

Create Your Own Groups After Your Pages Mature

The first thing that you need to know is that you should put up your Facebook group only after your page has matured. You want to know who your audience is on Facebook. You’re not going to know that until you have a page up.

Pay attention to the audience insights. The data set that you would get from that analytics portion of your Facebook management dashboard will let you know who to target.

Once you have enough users, and this depends on your niche, you should then put up your group. Your group must be as identical as possible to your page.

If you have a logo, but the same logo there. If you have some sort of motto, put the same motto or slogan there. The key here is to use your Facebook group as an extension of the brand that you’re creating with your Facebook fan page.

Give your group members a reason for coming back. This, of course, means original content or freshly curated content that you don’t show on your Facebook fan page.

You have to give people a reason for following you in as many different places on Facebook as possible. This, of course, boils down to premium content.

 

Market to Other Groups

This is the most important part of Facebook group marketing. Because if you were to just build your own group as a supplemental source of traffic for your page, you’re probably not going to grow all that much. You have to go to other groups which have already done a good job attracting the eyeballs that you want to attract.

There has to be a tight fit between these groups and your niche. Go to those places and become a credible poster. This means that you should refrain from just dumping the same content that you have on your page to these groups. Invest time in them to become a local expert or a credible authority. It doesn’t take much. If you’re the first person to always comment and your comments are always insightful or bring new information to the table, people sit up and pay attention. People can see that you are an asset to the community and they are more likely to give you the benefit of the doubt when you share content that obviously comes from your page.

 

Once you have established credibility, share your own page content. As I’ve mentioned above, these posts not only have content and your brand, but also a “like” button.

his is a great way of getting page fans.

Always engage. When people comment on what you post, reply. They might be haters, they might be critics, but it doesn’t matter-reply anyway. This conditions the mind of your readers that you are approachable, accessible, and you actually want to help people out.

If you just drop a link and take off immediately, you’re a spammer. You’re not a community member. You’re obviously not somebody who’s there to add to people’s knowledge and bring value to their lives.

 

My Most Important Tip

After sharing high-quality third-party content that you do not share on your page in groups, pay close attention to your page’s Audience Insight. Find your most popular piece of content. Look for third-party content that is similar to that and see if you get a lot of positive engagement when you share that material.

If this pans out, then use content from your site that fits the same themes as the tried and proven popular content on the Facebook groups that you’re in and use those to get page likes.

 

Influencer Page Outreach

Influencer page outreach really boils down to creating allies. In your niche, you are sure to have competitors. However, some of these competitors are open to cooperating with you. Many will not give you the time of day, but there are few who would see the strategic advantage of partnering up instead of competing.

There are also other people on Facebook who have pages and who are not competitors with you. They may even have a lot of fans.

 

Here’s how you build alliances with influential leaders on FB:

 

Step #1: Find competitors

The first thing that you need to do is to look at your notes when you reverse engineered your competitors. These people are in the same niche as you. After all, you studied them to get the “industry standard” content strategy as well as page layout and design for your own Facebook page.

Next, you should look for non-competitors who specialize in your niche. There should be quite a few of these.

These are not merchants or ones who provide services. They’re not competing for the same dollars as you. Instead, they cater to the same audience as you. Try to find as many of these as possible.

 

Step #2: Pay your dues by engaging

I know, at this point, it’s very tempting to just go to a competitor’s page and post a comment on one of their posts. In the comment, you’re dropping a link to your page or to your website. You then repeat this many times on all their posts.

Well, let me tell you, if you do this, you’re going to get banned. Whatever links you put up will get deleted. It’s a waste of time. Don’t even think about it.

The same applies to influential niche observers. These are noncompetitors, but you shouldn’t spam them either. Instead, you should pay your dues by engaging.

How do you do this? First, you need to share high-quality content.

 

It doesn’t matter who wrote the content. It doesn’t matter where that content goes to or links to. What’s important is that it provides maximum value to anybody reading that content.

It has to be on point. It has to deal with a specific theme or topic that you know that your target audience members are interested in.

Next, you need to engage with people in terms of answering their questions. Try to be a facilitator. Try to be a mediator. Try to be the “go-to” source of information for your niche.

 

If people are looking for statistics, go on Google and find them the statistics they’re looking for. If they’re looking for a video, go to YouTube and search for the content that they’re looking for.

The more you do this, the more people will pay attention to you because, let’s face it, in any kind of online group communication platform, only a very few people actually produce high-quality content. You can count them on one hand, most of the time.

Everybody else is basically a leech. They take and take information, but they only give from time to time, if at all.

Be that expert. Be that “go-to” resource.

 

Another way you can engage is by asking questions. Now, these questions should not be very basic or dumb questions. Instead, they should be deep, insightful questions.

You can also ask questions that try to tie many issues together. Maybe people are concerned about many different issues. When you ask questions that tie all these together, it can be very useful.

You should also give feedback to people’s responses. You have to do this in a respectful way. You cannot come off as a hater or somebody’s who’s just plain negative. There is such a thing as constructive feedback.

Remember, the name of the game here is to add value to the places that you’re on. This means sharing information and enhancing information through proper questions and feedback.

 

Step #3: Become credible, then reach out

At a certain point, people will start asking for you by name. People will try to reach out to you via Messenger. That’s when you know that you have become an asset to these groups. That’s when you know that you are on people’s radars.

You’re not just this random person showing up every once in a while, dropping a link. Instead, you’re that person that helps keep these groups together. This is when you reach out. This is when you try to engage with the group admin.

Usually, the best way to do this is when they engage with you. Maybe they mention your name, or they send you a message on Messenger. Whatever the case may be, try to wait for them, or reach a high enough level of engagement and acknowledgment from other community members before you reach out.

What are you going to be reaching out for? Well, there are many different opportunities on the table. You can ask to swap content with your page. Most page admins don’t have a problem with this.

You can also ask for a shout out. Basically, the admin of the page that you’re on will tell page fans to check out your page because your page is a “friend” of the page they run.

 

You can go through some ideas regarding joint events. Now, please keep in mind that this is not like a real event where people have to physically go somewhere, or you have to rent out some hall, rent out security, or get food. No.

This is an online event. Maybe a seminar, a live Facebook session conducted from two locations, or it can be an interview.

Another opportunity on the table is, of course, guest blogging. You probably don’t need me to remind you of how value-packed this is. Not only do you get eyeballs to your link, which can produce direct traffic, but you also get tremendous search engine optimization benefits if the partner has a high-value blog.

You can also reach out to infographics. This means you create an infographic and you get the admin to post the infographic on their blog with a link back to you. Again, this boosts your SEO chances.

Finally, you can collaborate on content. This is custom content intended for both your audiences.

 

Paid Page Boost Campaign

Another way you can get a lot of traffic from Facebook is by using a paid page boost. Basically, you are paying for the promotion of your page. This is different from a page post boost. You’re not promoting the content of your page. You’re promoting the page itself.

This is a great way to get page likes and to broaden the statistical demographics of your page. Why is this important? Why is it a big deal that you get a broad statistical demographics snapshot of people truly interested in whatever it is you are promoting?

You have to understand that Facebook works best when you target people by their interests. This is a bit tricky because if your page is statistically inaccurate as far as your niche is concerned, you probably would have a very faulty set of targeting parameters.

You’re not quite there when it comes to getting the interest of people you’re trying to reach.

 

This is why it’s crucial that your page gets a truly honest snapshot of the range of interests as well as demographic information of the people who are actually interested in whatever you are promoting. This is hard to achieve if you are just promoting your page organically.

Maybe you’re not putting in that much time in getting the word out about your page. Perhaps you are just sharing the word on several groups that may not line up, demographically speaking, with your niche.

Whatever the case may be there might be a blind spot there. This is why I suggest that at least at a minimal level engage in some sort of paid page boost campaign.

Make sure your page is mature enough before you launch a paid page boost campaign Make sure that your page has been around for a long enough time for it to build up enough user insight as well as engagement levels for you to accurately target the demographic you should begin with. This is important.

If you’re able to pull this off, then your demographics will help you run more successful campaigns involving your content or your direct traffic campaigns. These are campaigns that direct traffic from Facebook directly to your target website. You’re going to do that primarily using a lookalike audience campaign.

 

Make sure you’re ready for a sponsored page Ad buy

When you’re buying a sponsored page ad campaign, make sure your page looks good. Make sure you’re sending the right signals both in terms of graphics and text.

You don’t want to waste your money so make sure that at least everything looks like it’s ready to go. There has to be enough solid content on your page. This increases the likelihood that you will get a decent amount of page likes.

 

Where does this all lead to?

As I have mentioned above, if you get a lot of page likes, you will be able to target your intended audience better. In addition to that, you may be able to increase your reach because the more people that like your page, the bigger your base visibility becomes.

If a lot of those people actively engage with your content, that percentage increases, but you’re still dealing with the reality that your content will only reach a fairly small percentage of the people who have expressed interest in your content.

When you increase the total amount of likes you get, you still have that same small percentage, but the raw numbers are bigger. Believe me, 10 percent of 100 is definitely going to be smaller than 10 percent of 100,000. Which position would you rather be in? This is why it’s always a good idea to build up your page likes.

Hand in hand with this is the fact that you can profile your users better as I’ve mentioned above. This higher level of profiling paired with better content management and targeting, on your part, can lead to more content visibility. How come? Well, your reach can increase because of higher engagement levels.

If you pay attention to what kind of content people really like on your page, and you produce more of that content and you fine-tune it, so people are more likely to engage with it, this can increase your organic reach. This makes your content more visible.

 

What is engagement? Well, people can share your stuff. They can like it. They can react. They can comment. Whatever the case may get them to do it, and the best way to do this, of course, is to make sure that the right people are attracted to your page, and you put the right content in front of the right eyeballs.

Unfortunately, this doesn’t happen overnight. It is neither smooth nor easy. It’s one of those things that you figure out on your own on a trial-and-error basis, but you do have powerful tools like Facebook’s Audience Insights to see which content is resonating with your audience members.

You can’t just set this up and forget about it. You have to actively monitor it, you have to look for patterns, but the crucial ingredient to all of this is that your page gets enough likes. That’s why you have to promote it at some point.

 

Paid Traffic Campaign

For this section, I’m defining paid traffic campaigns in two forms. I can pay to boost the post, or I can pay for direct traffic to my target website. Please note that I have presented this information in that order: boost posts first and then pay for direct traffic.

There’s a reason for this. If you don’t master Facebook’s traffic to your page posts, then it doesn’t make sense to go directly to your target website. You probably are going to spend a tremendous amount of money, time and effort only to have very little to show for all that.

It’s better to boost a post in a strategic way so you can understand what kind of content connects with your intended audience. You will then be able to drive traffic to your website.

You’re actually killing several birds with one stone. By focusing on boosting a post, you can get more page likes, you can get more branding opportunities and you can also get click-throughs to your target website in the form of a content link.

 

Here’s how it works.

Post boosts

First, target a lookalike audience based on your user insight demographic. In other words, Facebook is going to show your ad to a fresh set of users who share the same demographic details and interests as your current page fans. People with these similarities are more likely to like your content.

You’re not going to pay Facebook to show your post to people who have already liked your page. Instead, you are trying to get fresh eyeballs to your page posts. You do run quite a bit of a risk.

 

Existing audience post boosts

The next option you have available to you is to boost your post to people who have actually liked your page. These are your actual page fans. They know roughly what you’re about, they like your content enough to like your page. They’re expecting your content.

Unfortunately, as I said earlier, Facebook only shows your content to a small fraction of people who liked your content. Unless your fans select See First when they like your page, Facebook will use its natural algorithm to select the initial group of eyeballs that will show your page content.

If enough people engage with your content, then Facebook will show even more of your page fans your content. However, it’s never going to show it to one hundred percent of your fans. That rarely happens.

 

This is why it’s a good idea to boost your post to reach more of the people who have liked your page. The upside to this is these are not virgins. They’ve seen your page. In fact, they’ve seen it and liked it so much that they have clicked the Like button and want to see your content.

At least you know that there is some sort of interest there. Still, please understand that while there is a certain degree of familiarity there, and this increases the chance that these people will actually engage with your content and possibly click-through to your target site, that isn’t exactly guaranteed.

 

Existing audience plus their friends

As the old saying goes, birds of a feather flock together. Friends usually have shared interests. In fact, if you think about it hard enough, that’s the main reason we became friends in the first place. We have certain interests in common, we have certain things to talk about and that’s why we’re friends. Makes a lot of sense, right?

Well, you can apply that to Facebook marketing as well because this can produce a tremendous amount of marketing opportunities. Since your page fans also have friends on Facebook, you can buy a post-boost that shows your ad not only to your fans but to their friends as well.

This is my favorite when it comes to posting boosts because it is a cheap way of getting clicks to your target site. You reach a much wider audience. Please understand that if your page has a fairly small number of likes, even if you boost post after post, you only have a small base to work with.

Now, if you expand that base by including your existing audience plus their friends, you have a lot more people to work with. You are operating with some level of confidence because you know that friends usually have shared interests. This translates to possibly cheap clicks to your target site.

 

The best way to do this is to post a link directly to your content or to your promotional page on your website with some content. This way when somebody clicks through, they go straight to your website.

They can read your commentary and some preview text, but the text should call them to action. This is the cleanest way to get direct traffic cheaply using post boosts targeting your existing audience and their friends.

 

Direct traffic to your target site

The next option is to promote a target URL directly. It doesn’t show a post from your page. It just goes directly to your target website paired with a picture. This is the direct traffic option on Facebook.

To become successful with this, you have to use the lookalike audience based on your engaged users’ insight data. In other words, your Facebook page should be mature enough for you to get solid consumer intelligence that you can then use to target potentially interested audiences on Facebook. That’s the best way to do this.

There are other ways. You can run raw targeting. Basically, you’re not relying on user insight. Instead, you’re just looking for an age range and a geographic location. You’re also using gender.

In certain situations, this may pay off. In fact, you may get better results than look-alike audiences but, generally speaking, you should focus on using the consumer intelligence your Facebook page gathered so you can reach people who are very similar to people you know have demonstrated a solid interest in whatever it is you’re promoting.

 

Best practices

Use them to boost your results.

First, run small tests. This enables you to fail quickly. People who really know their way around Facebook run campaign after campaign after campaign until they’re able to connect the dots and come up with a campaign that actually works.

This is why you need to run small, cheap tests so you can easily see which campaigns are working out and which ones have failed.

Next, make sure that your budget is low. Usually, when I run a dollar campaign, that is good enough for me. A dollar a day for seven days a week, that is good enough for me to see if an ad has potential. So, I would run several ads, we’re talking about seventy dollars for ten ads running at the same time.

 

Third, focus on what works. Let me tell you when you run many small tests, the winners stand out. Either they get clicks or not. That’s the bottom line. However, at this stage, you’re not just looking for clicks. You’re not just looking for an ad campaign that gets a lot of attention.

Instead, you’re also going to look for an ad campaign that actually delivers conversions. You’re going to have to set up your Facebook Pixel to your target website, so you can track whether traffic from Facebook went all the way through.

I’m not just talking about traffic produced when people click on your link and they go to a content page and they leave.

That’s worthless. That’s not going to help you. That traffic has to go to the content page, go to the sales page and, eventually, make it to the shopping cart. That’s when you know that your campaign actually has traction.

 

Focus on what works. Focus on what gets a high click-through rate paired with a conversion rate. However, to get there, you’re going to have to burn through many ads. This is not going to jump out at you. It’s not going to be obvious. It’s not going to be easy.

Once you have identified that ad and you’ve fine-tuned it, then scale it up. That’s how this works. Basically, you focus on what works and then pour real money into it.

 

Paid Lead Generation Campaigns

Did you know that on Facebook, you can collect e-mail? That’s right. You can collect leads. It’s pretty straightforward. You can run ad campaigns with a lead collection button. It can be Find Out More, Sign Up or another language.

Regardless, if you’re running this type of campaign, it must be highly targeted.

It’s really important that your targeting is spot on. I put this part of Facebook ad marketing at this point in the list of marketing methods because this takes quite a bit of work.

You should be quite familiar with Facebook before you even try this. You should know your way around Facebook’s ad system before you engage in a paid lead generation because it can get quite expensive.

If your ad doesn’t get many clicks or it’s super finely targeted, you don’t really have that many people to work with, and this can drive up your costs. You have to know how to optimize your ad campaigns on Facebook for this to make sense.

 

You can optimize on many levels

There are three levels you can optimize:

Level 1

You can tweak the freebie you’re giving away. This is the free stuff that you are giving away, so people are motivated to enter their e-mail address into your form.

Maybe you are giving away free membership access. Perhaps you are giving away a booklet or a book or a report, a set of templates, a set of graphics. Possibly even giving away software or a mobile app. Whatever the case maybe you are giving out freebies, and you need to optimize these.

What I mean by that is the freebie that you give must motivate the most people in your target audience to sign up for your mailing list. This is not easy.

You cannot assume that just because you think that your booklet is awesome or is the next best thing since sliced bread doesn’t automatically mean people will agree with you. It doesn’t work that way.

You may have to switch from one freebie to the other until you get a high-enough sign-up rate that would tell you that the freebie that you have selected is the right one.
Thankfully, this is fairly easy to do with Facebook. You basically run different ads that offer different premiums.

 

Level 2

Level 2 optimization focuses on optimizing your ad copy. As I’ve mentioned above, lead generation campaigns on Facebook can and do get very expensive. It seems like you’re doing all this for basically a handful of e-mails. This is why it’s really important to make sure that you run a fully optimized campaign to get the most results.

How do you do this? Well, you optimize your ad copy on an elemental level. Still, I want you to get a heads up this early on regarding the amount of optimization that you would have to do. It is quite intensive. You can’t leave things at a surface level. That’s just not going to work.

 

Level 3

Level 3 involves optimizing based on conversions. When people click on your Learn More or Sign Up button, they’re shown a form. You’re going to have to keep tweaking that form to say what it needs to say to convert as much of your traffic into list members as much as possible. This takes quite a bit of time and attention to detail.

Again, you have to run these experiments while minimizing your costs. Once you find out something that works, optimize it to increase its level of conversion.

Once you have picked a winner that cannot be optimized any further in terms of conversion rate improvements, that’s when you scale up. That’s when you pour in dollars to reach as many people as possible to boost your mailing list sign-up.

 

Facebook Pixel Retargeting Campaign

Facebook enables you to put their tracking pixel on your website. It will then track where people go on your site. If people end up at your shopping cart, for example, you can then run an ad reminding people about your site or reminding people about the products that they almost bought. They see these ads on Facebook.

Whatever the case may be Facebook Pixel Retargeting gives you another bite at the apple. One of the biggest problems with e-commerce is that prospective buyers abandon their shopping carts.

A large chunk of these buyers simply decides at the last minute or at some point in the buying process to dump their shopping cart. They don’t do follow through.

This is where the retargeting campaign begins. It’s basically a way of reminding people who have already expressed an interest in whatever it is you’re offering to come back. If anything, you recycle traffic that you have gotten from Facebook.

 

Another benefit of this technology is that it pulls traffic from Facebook that you did not get from it originally.

For example, if you did an independent marketing campaign completely free of Facebook but you put a Facebook Retargeting Pixel on your page, when people from that independent campaign, maybe it’s a forum promotion or search engine optimization or another social media platform or whatever source, go back to Facebook to check their accounts, your ad will show up. Sounds awesome, right?

These are all possible through a Facebook Pixel Retargeting Campaign. There are two steps to it. It’s pretty straightforward.

 

Install Facebook Pixel on your website

The first thing that you need to do is to install the Facebook tracking pixel on your site. To do this, you just go to Facebook’s business section and look for their pixels instructions. It’s pretty straightforward. Even if you are using WordPress as your content management system, installing Facebook Pixel is a breeze.

Next, you need to make sure that you drive traffic to your site. This means that you have to let traffic flow to your site for quite some time before you launch a retargeting campaign. It’s not a good idea to launch a campaign as quickly as possible.

You have to have enough targeting pixels installed in people’s browsers for this to make sense. Otherwise, there are just not enough people to work with. Now, keep in mind that if you are in a niche that has generally low traffic levels, then you would have to conduct your campaign even though the overall traffic flow to your website is fairly low.

 

Run ads on Facebook for retargeting

The ads that you’re going to run for Facebook Pixel Retargeting are going to be a bit different from the normal boosted posts or picture links that you run on Facebook. Instead, these are going to try to achieve two things. You can remind people about what they did.

Maybe they wanted to buy something, but they changed their mind at the last minute. Perhaps they were reading some sort of conversion article and were about to enter their e-mail address, but they didn’t. Whatever the case maybe you’re reminding them to come back to what they were doing before.

The other thing that you can do with your Facebook Pixel Retargeting campaign is to pull people deeper into your website. Usually, a website is composed of two parts.

The first layer is the content layer meaning you’re trying to get people to know about the problem, like your particular solution and eventually trust the solution enough so they can buy.

 

The other part, of course, is pretty straightforward. It’s all about buying. But there’s a complication. A lot of people would go through the content layers, but they never make it through to the actual buying part. They never make it to your conversion page. This is where retargeting ads that pull people deeper into your website makes a lot of sense.

For whatever reason somebody reading an article on your site decides to close the window and get out of your site, you can run ads that tell them about content but another piece of content that is related to what they were reading before. This pushes them further down the conversion funnel.

Alternatively, you can run an ad that promotes your conversion page. Basically, what you’re saying to the prospect is you’ve figured out what my website is about, and you have a clear understanding of what I have to offer.

 

Maximizing your results from Facebook Pixel Retargeting

I suggest that if you want to maximize the results you get from retargeting, promote your squeeze page. That’s right. Promote the page that recruits people to your mailing list.

Usually, there’s some sort of freebie. There’s usually some sort of book or booklet that you’re giving away so people can enter their email address.

Whatever the case may be push the squeeze page. Don’t dump them to your sales page unless, as I have mentioned above, they actually reached your shopping cart or conversion page and changed their minds at the last minute.

That’s pretty much the only situation where you should retarget showing an ad that goes directly to the conversion page. Other than that, convert them to sign up for your mailing list.

It’s your mailing list with its many chances at gaining attention, building trust and gaining credibility, which actually will do the heavy lifting as far as converting that prospect into an actual sale.

 

How to Optimize your FB Ad campaigns

Follow the steps below so you don’t overthink things and make bad decisions when optimizing your FB ads.

 

Reverse engineer your competitors and come up with a standard model

If you have a personal account, find your competitors and like their pages. Before you know it, you will start seeing ads either from your competitors themselves or from businesses that are very similar to your competitors. Pay close attention to these ads.

Reverse engineer them to find the standard model for these ads. In other words, go through as many of these ads as possible and get a clear understanding of what kind of pictures, headlines, and text they use. Also, if they are mostly promoting posts, pay attention to that.

Whatever the case may be look at what they’re doing and see common patterns. Focus on the most commonly used strategies because this gives you the industry-standard model.

Don’t get sidetracked by ads that seem so different, so new or so innovative because if they are so different from the industry-standard model, they’re outliers. There’s a high chance that those ads do not convert.

 

Come up with your own version and test with a low budget

Test with a low budget. You don’t want to burn through a tremendous amount of cash during the testing process. There will be a time and a place for you to get crazy with the budget but now is not the time.

 

Create variations and test

Now that you have come up with your own version of the standard model, create variations of it and then run low-budget tests. Do not do this randomly.

Do not do this based on your feelings or impulses, instead, you have to follow certain rules on how to create variations; otherwise, you wouldn’t know which part of the ad accounts for its greater success.

I’ve seen this happen many times. In fact, I’ve committed this mistake before. I would take an ad and test it. I would notice that it’s not getting that many clicks so I change half of the ad.

Maybe I change the picture and then the headline or I would change the heading and the description. Whatever the case maybe I would change half of the ad, and sure enough, it would improve but when I try to improve things again by changing the other half of the ad, it falls apart.

 

You want to establish a way of effectively tracking which changes accounted for which improvement. By using this method, you can optimize parts that work to reach peak convertibility and then work on the other elements of the ad that could use some improvement.

However, you have to do this in a systematic way. I’ve described this in the section below.

 

Pick the winner and make further variations

Now that you have made variations of the original and you ran a test, there will be at least one winner-it gets the most clicks and conversions. Make variations of it and you run the test again.

 

Keep testing until you find the ad that delivers the best return on investment

The end of this process is pretty straightforward. You keep making variations and you keep testing on the cheap until you find an ad that delivers the best ROI. In other words, it delivers the most conversions while costing very little money. I know it sounds like a fantasy at this point, but it is doable with testing.

 

Scale-up

Increase your ad budget to your winning ad to pump a massive amount of traffic to it. You should only do this when you are dead sure that you have a winning ad on your hands.

In other words, you have tested it rigorously and have optimized it to the point that it cannot improve its conversion rate any further, that’s when it’s ready to go big time.

 

Make sure you optimize on an elemental level

The big problem with the ad optimization method I described above is how do you know which part of the ad to change up? How do you know which part of the ad to optimize?

Wholesale variations do not work. You can’t just take an ad, see that it doesn’t work, replace it with a completely different Ad, see that it doesn’t work and then repeat that process.

Even if you’re spending very little money, it still burns a tremendous amount of time, effort and opportunities. You need to have a better way to turbocharge your results.

 

Vary on an element-by-element basis

I would take an ad, and I would restrict my optimization to a specific element of that ad. Every ad actually has many elements. There is the graphics, the heading, the description, the link. I would start with one element, and I will come up with different versions.

The most obvious part is the picture. So, I’d play around with the different pictures, and see which gets the most clicks. I would then come up with a variation of that picture and see if I can improve my click-through rate.

Again, I’m spending very little money here. I just want to see an improvement in the click-through rate for that element that I am varying. Once I have reached a plateau, and I can’t improve any more on that element, I would then switch to another element. For example, if I’m running a campaign for dog food, and I noticed that my best performing picture after a series of variations is a picture of a Chihuahua that seems to be smiling.

I will keep that picture but then I will then switch to the next element of the ad, which is the headline. I would then keep varying the headline to see if I can improve the conversion rate of that ad.

 

Once I’ve reached the ceiling or a plateau for improvements in conversions due to headline changes, I then move to the description. Do you see how this works?

You know that you have to vary an element if you keep picking the winning variation. You do this with small tests until the whole ad is optimized.

After all, elements have been optimized, scale up your ad buy.

Once I’ve gotten an ad that converts much better than its original form, and I’ve gone through all the elements, now is the time to scale up. This is where I pour quite a large amount of cash into my Facebook ad campaign to boost traffic.

 

Conclusion

Facebook marketing is a lot of fun because there are a lot of things to discover, but it can also get very expensive if you don’t know what you’re doing.

Follow the eight proven promotion methods covered in this training so you can start your Facebook promotion campaign on a solid path to success.

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